Re: Strange night on the radio


Russ Edmunds <wb2bjh@...>
 

There could be many reasons. Usually the reason is that the granted power doesn't provide sufficient coverage to bother -- as you suggest.

Russ Edmunds
Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
[15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id

FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot


--- On Fri, 4/23/10, Stephen wrote:

From: Stephen
Subject: [ultralightdx] Re: Strange night on the radio
To: ultralightdx@...
Date: Friday, April 23, 2010, 12:19 PM

 

What about ones that have full night authorization at a low power, but choose not to use it? One example I know of is 740 KBRT Avalon, CA, a 10kW directional daytimer. They have a license for 113 watts at night, but they choose to shut down completely at night, I'm thinking probably because of KBRT San Francisco's monster signal in So Cal at night.

--- In ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com, Russ Edmunds wrote:
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> The higher power prevails in the example below, however stations do have the option not to use them. For instance, and using KWRE as an example, let's say they have a convenient way to achieve 120 watts, but for some reason not so for 152. Then they could opt to use the 120 and not the 152.
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> Before the advent of modern transmitters, many stations couldn't achieve their assigned PSSA powers - and in many cases to follow, PSRA power and even the new night powers. If you have a 500 watt transmitter, it's not easy to achieve a 12 watt PSSA or PSRA with that, and buying something which would wasn't always the answer, so many stations back in the day never used these low powers, or else used the lowest power they could achieve.
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> Russ Edmunds
> Blue Bell, PA ( 360' ASL )
> [15 mi NNW of Philadelphia]
> 40:08:45N; 75:16:04W, Grid FN20id
>
> FM: Yamaha T-80 & Onkyo T-450RDS w/ APS9B @15'
> AM: Modified Sony ICF 2010 barefoot
>
> --- On Thu, 4/22/10, Mark Roberts wrote:
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> From: Mark Roberts
> Subject: Re: [ultralightdx] Re: Strange night on the radio
> To: ultralightdx@ yahoogroups. com
> Date: Thursday, April 22, 2010, 11:42 PM
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> On Thu, Apr 22, 2010 at 2:00 PM, Russ Edmunds wrote:
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> > Toast only in the sense that the documentation is not recoverable and therefore not observable. To my knowledge, the FCC has not gone after any stations on account of the FCC's failure to keep the records -- nor the station's, given the age of the original authroizations.
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> These values have changed over the years, too, if the one example that
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> I'm very familiar with is any indication. My first radio job was at
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> KWRE in Warrenton, Mo. Even by the mid-1970s, KWRE already had what
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> was then called a PSA. It was on a telegram pinned up next to the
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> license. It called for pre-sunrise power of 152 watts. When you look
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> at the modern-day PSRA, it's for a variety of power levels, all of
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> which are less than 152 watts.
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> (During thunderstorms, the power switch retrofitted to the old Collins
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> transmitter had the annoying tendency to trip, knocking the station
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> down to lower power time and again.)
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> KWRE now has fulltime authorization for 120 watts at night. I wonder
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> how that works in conjunction with the PSRA and PSSA authorizations. I
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> presume that the higher power "wins" - i.e., KWRE could broadcast with
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> 120 watts during the 6 am to sunrise hours even if the PSRA calls for
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> less power.
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> There's no issue of a DA here - KWRE is omnidirectional, and always
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> has been. So in the case of KWRE, I'm not sure what purpose the PSRA
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> or PSSA serve. Perhaps these letters are automatically generated based
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> on the daytime power and the station is free to use or not use the
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> authorization as it desires?
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