Re: Update of World Distance Records 10 kw and 1 kw barefoot categories


John H. Bryant <bjohnorcas@...>
 






At 05:35 PM 10/14/2008 -0400, you wrote:

On Tue, Oct 14, 2008 at 1:41 PM, Paul Logan <paulloganradio@... > wrote:

1 kw barefoot category:

1700    KVNS, Brownsville, TX    1    USA    06:12    10/10/2008    4789 miles    7706 km

KVNS surprisingly is the most regular and often loudest X band signal here it was just a matter of time before it made it through barefoot. Logged playing oldies after a yl with id.



Jay then noted:

I'm not accusing anyone of anything or trying to taint any records, but I don't think I'd be the first to suspect KVNS might, on rare occasion, "forget" to switch to night power. They often dominate here in Orlando despite being five times further away than WJCC and allegedly running 880W vs WJCC's 1000W.  Admittedly, about 900 of the 1000 miles between KVNS and my house are over water, but that's still quite a distance for them to so clearly pummel WJCC into the noise.

  -- Jay


You make a good point, Jay.... I think that a couple of the other records in the low power Western Hemisphere area are from stations that may be running more than their authorized power.... just a personal opinion, though (they are records with my own name attached.) 

In my experience with Pacific and Far East stations, I'd guess that KVNS may be cheating, or alternatively, the antenna may be very fortunately situated (in a salt marsh, etc.) or there may be a semi-permanent bubble in the ionosphere that is perfectly situated to act as an amplifier.

A couple of examples:  For several years, 4BC in Brisbane suddenly became the most prominent station on the DU band for those of us in the NW.... really odd, since their frequency was mid-band (1116) and they are a lower powered commercial station (as opposed to the Big Gun ABC government stations.)  We finally found out that they had remodelled and upgraded their antenna/ground system at just the time when they became so prominent. On the other hand, this past summer, two stations in Christchurch, NZ on the South Island were suddenly the most prominent Kiwis by far... very unusual for South Island stations to do that... they are so much farther away. What is more, their prominence was VERY pronounced and lasted all season. I was convinced that both had either boosted power or also redone their antenna and ground systems.  I've now heard from the technical staffs at both stations.... neither have made any changes in recent years. I don't really have an explanation for what we heard this summer.... except I keep thinking about the Giant Red Spot on Jupiter.... its a huge storm or wind system that has been stable for decades, if not centuries, even though it is part of a gaseous atmosphere.  Besides the waves (ripples) in the ionosphere that we know to exist, I wonder if there aren't other structures that could form week-long or even season-long ducts..... 

So, yeah, KVNS may be cheating, but they may not be.... Jay, what do you suggest as an alternative to just accepting their published power as far running an awards or distance record program????  Should we vote on whether we think a particular station is running their legal power or not? Or should we ask for volunteers to go to the stations that we suspect and ask to perform an inspection? Surely neither of those are workable ideas.

I've always assumed that the only choice is to either accept an imperfect system or not have a records or award program at all....  Seriously, I'm not very happy with the current situation... in fact, it is a sore point with me as is probably apparent.  If there is some way to determine actual transmitted power for our use, I'd sure like to hear about it.

Thanks for the comment, Jay.... I'll take my soapbox and steal away into the night!


John B.


John B.
Orcas Island, WA, USA
Rcvrs: WiNRADiO 313e, Eton e1, Ultralights
Antennas: Wellbrook Phased Array SE/NW
Two 70' x 100' Conti Super Loops, West and Northwest

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